Skip to content

Italiano 1o1/lezione#19/presente/II conjugation

November 2, 2011
tags:

P1080295

As you probably remember, we’ve talked about indicativo presente before, but we only covered the first conjugation (the verbs ending in –ARE), so, after a short break, and a couple of vocabulary posts, I figured it’s time for some more grammar, and verbs ending in –ERE (the second conjugation, obviously).

The process is the same as with the first conjugation, with some slight differences.

We will use the verb LEGGERE (to read), as an example.

First, you need to get rid of the –ERE, of course, so that you are left with the root LEGG- and add the terminations:

II CONJUGATION-LEGGERE

Io legg-o Noi legg-iamo
Tu legg-i Voi legg-ete
Lui/Lei legg-e Loro legg-ono

 

I’ve predicted that some of you may not remember the last lezione, so, just as a little reminder, here’s the table with the forms of presente indicativo of the verb amare:

I CONJUGATION-AMARE

Io am-o Noi am-iamo
Tu am-i Voi am-ate
Lui/Lei am-a Loro am-ano

 

Here you can see the differences between the first and the second conjugation in action. I’ve marked them in the second table. As you can see here, the terminations reflect the conjugation (the –ARE conjugation utilizes terminations with the vocal A, while the –ERE conjugations, uses E or O).

***Keep in mind that the pronunciation of the GG in the root of this particular verb changes depending on the termination:

In Italian G can be pronounced in two ways: as G (leggo, or leggono) or as (pronounced like in the English word imagewhen the letter g is followed by E or I- leggi, legge, leggiamo).

I realize this is a lot to tackle right now, but I’m still working on a way of explaining the pronunciation, so for now, this will have to do. If you have any ideas on how I can make the topic more accessible, please write!

Next time, we’re up against the tricky, thirst conjugation (my god, when will she end this torture -you must be wondering by now). 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: